Monthly Archive: October 2015

Reviews for Sale

I guess there really is a market for everything. It would never have occured to me to sell reviews, or to buy reviews if I were a seller. Amazon is suing 1114 individual reviewers, as well it should. I rely, to some degree, on reviews when buying things.

I have perhaps a bad habit of never getting around to reviews, though sometimes if I am especially pleased, or vice-versa, I will. There are products you can’t review until you’ve used them a while. I recently bought an Android tablet that was well reviewed, seemed reasonable in quality, and had a higher price than three ill-fated tablets I’d ordered from Walmart. The cheaper ones disappointingly lasted only a few months, and were flaky in the meantime. I bought the seemingly better one to replace one of those. It lasted ten days. Technically, eight, since the date of the order is two days before we received it. The weakest point of all of them seems to be the screen. This one at least had wi-fi that worked reliably, plus it charged reliably and lasted well between charges. It breaking inspired a review. But I digress.

If I am going to look at reviews and average stars to help steer my buying (not that I haven’t bought things that had no rating at all yet), I want to know they are legitimate. I was dismayed enough that the company from which I bought my daughter a clarinet rewards a review with a second year of warranty.

I Am Not A Millenial

But this open letter to management from a millenial makes some excellent point, starting with a bang with “You tolerate low-performance.” Now, there are reasons this happens more than it should. As a former manager said regarding being able to get rid of a poor employee: “There’s too many laws.” And this isn’t even a country where you’re really stuck with a person once you have hired them, so it’s best not to hire if at all possible.

Dell And EMC

The big news today is about Dell buying EMC. This hits close to home, EMC being a Massachusetts company and employing people I know. It also reminds me of all the people I knew who worked for DEC before it was bought by Compaq, which still seems odder to me than the current merger. But then, DEC was shortsighted in some ways, missing the boat when it came to microcomputers, even more than IBM, which at least grasped things enough to create a market and widely adopted standards. IBM has been seen to varying degrees as the walking dead for decades, yet somehow kept going, even thriving. Then again, installed base creates inelasticity on the way to doom. Just ask COBOL. This is why, in the absence of total annihilation, civilization itself will not collapse absolutely and immediately in the face of many possible disasters. But I digress.

EMC is arguably more focused, robust and nimble than was DEC, and a better fit with Dell than was DEC with Compaq. It could work, until enough of their combined business goes obsolete. We’ll see.