Business

C is for Conglomerate

Recently I found myself toying with the new .XYZ top level domain, checking whether anything interesting might be available.

Naturally I tried abc.xyz which, predictably, was taken. Makes sense, right? Since something like ABC would naturally tend to snag a new TLD to match, or since someone like me, but faster, would snag it on a whim.

Some whim!

Google is now under an umbrella of many disparate companies in one, but as Alphabet, rather than as Google. It becomes one of many. I found out about this in the middle of the night, just before going to my “day job,” seeing the announcement at that time.

My overwhelming thought about it since then has been: Didn’t we used to call this a conglomerate? Those were all the rage, decades ago. Breaking those up to extract shareholder value was all the rage fewer decades ago.

Still, if being a conglomerate is effectively a done deal already, it makes some sense to brand the conglomeration differently from the original and presumably still most major component of the conglomerate. One could poke fun at the name, but hey, this is a company that called itself Google and wound up taken utterly seriously.

My secondary thought: .XYZ will be taken seriously as a TLD in a way that it might not have been.

Walter S. Mack Jr

Don Surber has been running a series of posts on exceptional Americans, with the first set now in book form. Many of them are, naturally, people from the world of business, invention and innovation.

Today’s example was a real education for me, as I did not know the history of Pepsi, or how there came to be a longstanding two cola rivalry.

Read about Walter S. Mack Jr and how he turned an obscure drink owned by a candy company into a huge success, at the same time helping to normalize racial equality of opportunity.

Public Domain Alternate History

Had copyright law remained as it was in 1957, quite a list of works would have become public domain on January 1, 2014. As noted at the link, famous works will tend to remain available, if not as inexpensively so as might be the case, but I am concerned with orphan works. When I look up books I liked as a child and cannot find them in print, or in print at a price one can afford, then the copyright holder either has no interest in holding them in copyright, or there is no living copyright holder, heir or assign who is aware or interested in that status. Such works have no reason to remain protected. Even if that protection lies only in fear that someone who can legitimately prove ownership might come out of the woodwork after all, if any interest is shown.

Worst are the academic publications that are behind overpriced paywalls that keep the useful arts and sciences from being promoted. Congress ought to be ashamed of extending copyrights to unconstitutional lengths, and courts out to be ashamed of going along with it. At least, I assume they have, since there must have been challenges. Copyright should not be controlled by media corporations. That was never the idea.

Just In Time Delivery Meets Weather

I hadn’t realized it was this bad, but I knew FedEx Ground and Home had delays that varied from terminal to terminal due to weather delays and closures rippling through the system. The thing is, this makes it sound like it was connected heavily to FedEx Express shipments and the equivalent UPS services, where people order late and rely on the expectated or even guaranteed miraculously fast deliveries they pull off. I did some of that myself, relatively speaking. UPS, USPS, and FedEx Express all preformed beautifully. I suspect we’re just all used to that being the norm, and we are not used to having over 50% snow cover nationally before Christmas (or January, really) arrives. It raised serious havoc. If you close a busy hub for multiple days due to weather, look out. Then they can push packages out as fast as they want, but local terminals and delivery vans have to be able to process and deliver them.

Lessons learned, no doubt, but sometimes it’s beyond anyone’s control.