Law

I Am Not A Millenial

But this open letter to management from a millenial makes some excellent point, starting with a bang with “You tolerate low-performance.” Now, there are reasons this happens more than it should. As a former manager said regarding being able to get rid of a poor employee: “There’s too many laws.” And this isn’t even a country where you’re really stuck with a person once you have hired them, so it’s best not to hire if at all possible.

Yellow Pages

Warren Meyer has a post about a Yellow Pages (now YP) nightmare that begins to smell like fraud. Talk about desperation, continuing to bill you after you’ve closed a location and informed them as much repeatedly.

Anyway, this reminded me of my experience with Verizon Yellow Pages when I ran XTreme Computing. It’s more humorous than anything, although we never got the slightest little bit of work from an ad in our local book and listings in the books for a large chucnk of Southeastern Massachusetts. All we did was generate a phone bill that peaked at over $800 a month when most of it was the monthly charge for Yellow Pages.

When I spoke with the sales rep about getting an ad, she gave me a number. I was excited, because the number was low compared to what I’d expected, to the tune of half what I thought it would be for the year. I went all expansive, pricing listings in other books than our own.

Then I found out that what I had taken to be an annual rate was a monthly rate! No wonder it seemed low. It was, in fact, high. Extrapolating from my initial perception, that would make it about six times what I had expected.

After a year, I canceled most of it. After 2-3 years I canceled the local ad, too. We couldn’t afford or justify it. Heck, eventually I canceled our second line, for faxing, and well before we closed entirely, I canceled our phone service entirely. There really was never any excuse for it to be as costly as it was. By that time, I could be reached by pager, cell or e-mail more readily than by the office phone, and I worked from home more than not.

In retrospect, we should never have done the Yellow Pages in the first place, and arguably should have skipped the second line.

Public Domain Alternate History

Had copyright law remained as it was in 1957, quite a list of works would have become public domain on January 1, 2014. As noted at the link, famous works will tend to remain available, if not as inexpensively so as might be the case, but I am concerned with orphan works. When I look up books I liked as a child and cannot find them in print, or in print at a price one can afford, then the copyright holder either has no interest in holding them in copyright, or there is no living copyright holder, heir or assign who is aware or interested in that status. Such works have no reason to remain protected. Even if that protection lies only in fear that someone who can legitimately prove ownership might come out of the woodwork after all, if any interest is shown.

Worst are the academic publications that are behind overpriced paywalls that keep the useful arts and sciences from being promoted. Congress ought to be ashamed of extending copyrights to unconstitutional lengths, and courts out to be ashamed of going along with it. At least, I assume they have, since there must have been challenges. Copyright should not be controlled by media corporations. That was never the idea.