Marketing

Reviews for Sale

I guess there really is a market for everything. It would never have occured to me to sell reviews, or to buy reviews if I were a seller. Amazon is suing 1114 individual reviewers, as well it should. I rely, to some degree, on reviews when buying things.

I have perhaps a bad habit of never getting around to reviews, though sometimes if I am especially pleased, or vice-versa, I will. There are products you can’t review until you’ve used them a while. I recently bought an Android tablet that was well reviewed, seemed reasonable in quality, and had a higher price than three ill-fated tablets I’d ordered from Walmart. The cheaper ones disappointingly lasted only a few months, and were flaky in the meantime. I bought the seemingly better one to replace one of those. It lasted ten days. Technically, eight, since the date of the order is two days before we received it. The weakest point of all of them seems to be the screen. This one at least had wi-fi that worked reliably, plus it charged reliably and lasted well between charges. It breaking inspired a review. But I digress.

If I am going to look at reviews and average stars to help steer my buying (not that I haven’t bought things that had no rating at all yet), I want to know they are legitimate. I was dismayed enough that the company from which I bought my daughter a clarinet rewards a review with a second year of warranty.

Pricing for Freelancers

Pricing is always a favorite topic of mine. I have always had a tendency to undervalue my own skills and efforts, and to price too low, then be just as disgusted as I am with people not valuing the work enough to pay what the actual price should be. Worse, it doesn’t actually get you more work to lowball yourself. There’s a psychological element with me. First, what I find easy, I can’t imagine people wanting to pay much for. Second, I have spent a lifetime at generally limited means, and I can’t imagine paying the amount that is generally charged for most services, including those I could provide. Third, I was raised, somehow, not to think well of my own work and skills. This has tended to make me sound to others like I brag when I state how good I am in some way, when that is more of an attempt to convince myself and perhaps thwart negativity from others that would persuade me downward. But I digress.

The actual point of this post is to link to pricing advice for freelancers that explains why you should remove the zeros. Excellent thinking.

Yellow Pages

Warren Meyer has a post about a Yellow Pages (now YP) nightmare that begins to smell like fraud. Talk about desperation, continuing to bill you after you’ve closed a location and informed them as much repeatedly.

Anyway, this reminded me of my experience with Verizon Yellow Pages when I ran XTreme Computing. It’s more humorous than anything, although we never got the slightest little bit of work from an ad in our local book and listings in the books for a large chucnk of Southeastern Massachusetts. All we did was generate a phone bill that peaked at over $800 a month when most of it was the monthly charge for Yellow Pages.

When I spoke with the sales rep about getting an ad, she gave me a number. I was excited, because the number was low compared to what I’d expected, to the tune of half what I thought it would be for the year. I went all expansive, pricing listings in other books than our own.

Then I found out that what I had taken to be an annual rate was a monthly rate! No wonder it seemed low. It was, in fact, high. Extrapolating from my initial perception, that would make it about six times what I had expected.

After a year, I canceled most of it. After 2-3 years I canceled the local ad, too. We couldn’t afford or justify it. Heck, eventually I canceled our second line, for faxing, and well before we closed entirely, I canceled our phone service entirely. There really was never any excuse for it to be as costly as it was. By that time, I could be reached by pager, cell or e-mail more readily than by the office phone, and I worked from home more than not.

In retrospect, we should never have done the Yellow Pages in the first place, and arguably should have skipped the second line.

Walter S. Mack Jr

Don Surber has been running a series of posts on exceptional Americans, with the first set now in book form. Many of them are, naturally, people from the world of business, invention and innovation.

Today’s example was a real education for me, as I did not know the history of Pepsi, or how there came to be a longstanding two cola rivalry.

Read about Walter S. Mack Jr and how he turned an obscure drink owned by a candy company into a huge success, at the same time helping to normalize racial equality of opportunity.